Home General Knowledge GK SPECIAL TOPIC : MEANING OF HOUSE IN CENSUS 2011
GK SPECIAL TOPIC : MEANING OF HOUSE IN CENSUS 2011
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Tuesday, 22 April 2014 08:16


GK SPECIAL TOPIC

 

MEANING OF HOUSE IN CENSUS 2011

The Indian Census has a rich tradition and enjoys the reputation of being one of the best in the world. The first Census in India was conducted in the year 1872. This was conducted at different points of time in different parts of the country. In 1881 a Census was taken for the entire country simultaneously. Since then, Census has been conducted every ten years, without a break. The Census of India 2011 was the fifteenth in this unbroken series since 1872 and the seventh after independence.

Census House

A 'Census House' is a building or part of a building used or recognized as a separate unit because of having a separate main entrance from the road or common courtyard or staircase etc. It may be occupied or vacant. It may be used for a residential or non-residential purpose or both.

If a building has a number of Flats or Blocks/Wings, which are independent of one another having separate entrances of their own from the road or a common staircase or a common courtyard leading to a main gate, these will be considered as separate Census houses.

Household

A 'household' is usually a group of persons who normally live together and take their meals from a common kitchen unless the exigencies of work prevent any of them from doing so. The persons in a household may be related or unrelated or a mix of both. However, if a group of unrelated persons live in a Census house but do not take their meals from the common kitchen, then they will not collectively constitute a household.Each such person should be treated as a separate household.The important link is in finding out whether it is a household or not is a common kitchen. There may be one member households, two member households or multi-member households.

In a few situations, it may be difficult to apply the definition of household strictly as given above. For example, a person living alone in a Census house, whether cooking meals or not, will have to be treated as a household. Similarly, if husband and wife or a group of related persons are normally living together in a Census house but are getting cooked meals from outside due to some reason will also constitute a normal household.

There are three types of households namely, i) Normal households, ii) Institutional households and iii) Houseless households.

Normal Household

A 'Normal household' is usually a group of persons who normally live together and take their meals from a common kitchen unless the exigencies of work prevent any of them from doing so. The persons in a normal household may be related or unrelated or a mix of both whereas in an institutional household the persons are unrelated. Another difference between the normal and institutional household is in case of institutional households, the persons live in an institution unlike in a normal household.

Institutional Household

A group of unrelated persons who live in an institution and take their meals from a common kitchen is called an 'Institutional Household'. Examples of Institutional Households are boarding houses, messes, hostels, hotels, rescue homes, observation homes, beggars' homes, jails, ashrams, old age homes, children homes, orphanages, etc.

If in a building which is occupied by an Institutional Household, the families of the warden and peon are also living in separate Census houses and cooking for themselves separately, then each family will be treated as a separate household and the houses occupied by them will be treated as separate Census houses. In this situation there will be one building, three Census houses and three households, i.e., one Institutional Household and two Normal Households.

In certain cities and towns, especially in close proximity to educational / vocational institutions, universities, IT and other companies, business centers, corporations, etc., a number of housing units providing Paying Guest (PG) accommodation to students, trainees, employees, etc. have sprung up. The service provider of such accommodation receives fixed monthly charges for lodging, meals and other facilities provided to the inmates. If a group of unrelated persons is found living and sharing a common kitchen in such Paying Guest accommodation, it will be considered as an Institutional Household only if such a PG accommodation is registered. If it is not registered, it may be treated as a normal household. If the inmates of the PG accommodation are not sharing meals from a common kitchen, then each such inmate should be treated as a separate normal household.

If a group of unrelated persons, sharing a common kitchen, is found living in a Census house which is not an institution, such a household will not form an institutional Household. The listing of such households will be done like other normal households.

Houseless Household

Households which do not live in buildings or Census houses but live in the open or roadside, pavements, in hume pipes, under fly-overs and staircases, or in the open in places of worship, mandaps, railway platforms, etc., are to be treated as Houseless households. Houseless Households are not to be covered in Houselisting phase.




Last Updated on Wednesday, 23 April 2014 07:15
 

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